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Science

A brain hovers over a chess board, lines flow from the hypothalamus to the pieces, symbolising control over reactions to an aggressor and territory.

Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight

Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. They have identified a specific area…

By Rossana De Lorenzi

Science

Open access COVID-19 data sharing

Open data sharing accelerates COVID-19 research

Open access data benefits millions of scientists around the world and is essential for a rapid response to the COVID-19…

By Vicky Hatch

Science

Four blue circular objects are surrounded with green structures, and the central blue circle with pink structures. The blue circles are human cell nuclei, and pink and green structures are proteins.

Repurposing drugs for a pan-coronavirus treatment

Scientists from the Beltrao Group at EMBL-EBI and collaborators identified drug targets common to SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and MERS-CoV, three…

By Vicky Hatch

Science

Seeing evolution happening before your eyes

Researchers from EMBL Heidelberg have established an automated pipeline to create mutations in genomic enhancers, letting them watch evolution unfold…

By Mathias Jäger

Science

Molecular structure of essential light chain protein in Plasmodium glideosome. The atoms connected by bonds are symbolised by short connected lines. They are surrounded by electrons – the electron density is depicted as shapes resembling clouds. Water molecules are visible in several places as red spots. The data used to create this 3D model were obtained using X-ray crystallography at Petra III beamline, at EMBL Hamburg.

How deadly parasites ‘glide’ into human cells

A group of scientists led by EMBL Hamburg’s Christian Löw provide insights into the molecular structure of proteins involved in the gliding…

By Dorota Badowska

Science

Graphical representation of genome editing tool CRISPR in green and pink. Nobel prize medal on the right.

Powerful genome editing tool recognised by Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The genome editing tool CRISPR–Cas9 – which plays a critical role in EMBL’s research – was recognised by the Nobel Prize in…

By Ivy Kupec

Science

A series of images demonstrates the cell cycle trajectory, the first frame in each row shows a cell’s nucleus in grey. As it moves through its life cycle and enters new phases, markers change colour from red to green to pinpoint progression.

Deep learning captures cell cycle

Members of an EMBL-led research group with collaborators in Estonia and Russia have built and trained a deep learning model to better understand how…

By Ivy Kupec

Science

Composite image of mouse cells and human cells showing different levels of luminescence, indicated as different colours.

Human and mouse cells run at different speeds

The internal clock that governs the development of embryos ticks slower for humans than for mice. Differences in the speed of biochemical reactions…

By Luca Tancredi Barone

Science

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug

Researchers have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy – a leading cause of heart failure – and identified a potential treatment for it: a…

By Mathias Jäger

Science

Human silhouette showing internal organs including oesophagus and stomach. Circle with DNA bases A,T, C and G superimposed.

Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection

The Gerstung Group at EMBL-EBI and collaborators have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a…

By Oana Stroe

Science

Left: Slice of a cell in grey. Right: Two 3D reconstructions of parts of the slice, showing the internal structure.

Nuclear pores in their natural context

Scientists from the Beck group have studied the 3D structure of nuclear pores in budding yeast. They show how the architecture of the nuclear pore…

By Fabian Oswald

Science

How to remove unwanted components from the cell nucleus

Researchers have uncovered how cells remove unwanted components from the nucleus following…

By Mathias Jäger

Science

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