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This visual representation shows the newly identified architecture (left) of the coupled molecular machines responsible for transcription (green; DNA in magenta) and translation (blue and yellow), accompanied by the protein interaction network from mass spectrometry (centre) and the cryo-electron tomography data (right) from Mycoplasma pneumoniae that was used to model the structure. Credit: Liang Xue and Julia Mahamid/EMBL

Visualising the cell’s molecular machinery in action

A new approach that allows researchers to see molecular machinery at work inside cells has offered a deeper understanding of how bacteria produce proteins and a unique glimpse into how they respond to antibiotics.

By Ivy Kupec

Science

Europe PMC logo with red viral particles floating around it. Credit: Spencer Phillips/EMBL, iStock

Europe PMC: unlocking the potential of COVID-19 preprints

Europe PMC has begun indexing full-text COVID-19 preprints along with the associated data. The project aims to accelerate research to fight the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Screenshot from the online SAXS course. Clement Blanchet, a senior scientist in the Svergun group at EMBL Hamburg, is presenting the P12 SAXS beamline at Petra III to the participants.

EMBL releases online course on solution scattering from biological macromolecules

The Svergun group at EMBL Hamburg has released the course ‘Solution Scattering from Biological Macromolecules’ in an online format for the first time. The course explores different aspects of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for studying the structure of macromolecules.

By Dorota Badowska

Events

Atomic model of the entire condensin complex

Understanding chromosome organisation

EMBL scientists and collaborators help reveal the process by which enormous quantities of DNA are folded into cells.

By Edward Prior

Science

Small dots. Some in bright yellow.

An ocean of droplets

Bacterial cells are embedded in microfluidic droplets in oil. The fluorescence indicates the presence of the targeted DNA strain with the help of a characteristic DNA sequence.

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

Mosaic of microscopy images of tumour, forming two broken DNA molecules

Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that uses computer vision to analyse tissue samples from cancer patients. The algorithm can distinguish between healthy and cancerous tissues, and can also identify patterns DNA and RNA changes in tumours.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

A row of ceiling windows

A bright view of the future

The image shows one of the four rows of roof lights above the atrium, which is the main public space of the Imaging Centre.

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

Top row: The evolution of tumour cells (green) within a normal organoid (grey) shown in three panels. Lower row: Surface rendition of tumour cells and labels new cells that arise from a single cell in the same colour.

A tool to improve cancer research

EMBL scientists have created a new, realistic 3D testbed that could help achieve the goal of stopping cancers before they start by studying cancer cells as they first form.

By Ivy Kupec

Science

A magnifying glass hovers over the human gut, revealing its biodiversity.

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

An international team of scientists has collated all known bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome into a single large database. Their work will allow researchers to explore the links between bacterial genes and proteins, and their effects on human health.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

EMBO and EMBL logos.

Response to the proposed compromise on the EC’s Multiannual Financial Framework

EMBL Director General Edith Heard and EMBO Director Maria Leptin respond to the current proposal on the Multiannual Financial Framework.

By Guest author(s)

Lab Matters

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