Edit

Different parts of a fruit fly arranged into an artificial green eye.

The eye of science

This image is a composite of lateral pentascolopidial organs, a wing imaginal disc pouch, and an epithelial wound in a Drosophila larva. The organs are arranged here like eyelashes. Cells surrounding an epidermal wound appear as the iris and pupil of this artistic eye.

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

Black and white photo of Phil Avner sitting in his office and looking at his smartphone. a large stack of papers on his desk

Arrivederci Phil!

As he enters retirement, Head of EMBL Rome Phil Avner reflects on his scientific career and memories from his time as Head of EMBL’s site in Italy

By Rossana De Lorenzi

Lab Matters

Logo of the European Laboratory for Learning and Intelligent Systems. Left: A chalkboard drawing of Europe. Right: the letters E L L I S in different colours.

Bridging artificial intelligence and the life sciences – launch of ELLIS Heidelberg

Researchers from all life science disciplines – from fundamental biological research to medical applications – generate immense datasets. Analysing these datasets and gaining new knowledge from them is a growing challenge for scientists. The fields of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine…

By Mathias Jäger

Lab Matters

The tuatara, an iguana-like reptile with a crest of spikes, sits on a forest floor.

The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril

A global team of researchers including the Flicek Team at EMBL-EBI has partnered up with the Māori tribe Ngātiwai to sequence the genome of the tuatara, a rare reptile endemic to New Zealand.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

A long string of cells - red in the centre, yellow at the border.

Fish close-up

This group of cells represents an interesting example of organ formation where cells simultaneously move and change their shapes in a highly coordinated manner.

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

A woman with glasses holds a book. The book cover says "Gene naming rules". Thought bubbles float around her head and display gene symbols like BRCA1.

Bagpipe and Pokemon, or how not to name a human gene

The human genome harbours about 19 000 protein-coding genes, many of which still have no known function. As scientists unveil the secrets of our DNA, they come across novel genes that they need to refer to using a unique name. The Human Genome Organisation’s Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) at…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

This visual representation shows the newly identified architecture (left) of the coupled molecular machines responsible for transcription (green; DNA in magenta) and translation (blue and yellow), accompanied by the protein interaction network from mass spectrometry (centre) and the cryo-electron tomography data (right) from Mycoplasma pneumoniae that was used to model the structure. Credit: Liang Xue and Julia Mahamid/EMBL

Visualising the cell’s molecular machinery in action

A new approach that allows researchers to see molecular machinery at work inside cells has offered a deeper understanding of how bacteria produce proteins and a unique glimpse into how they respond to antibiotics.

By Ivy Kupec

Science

Europe PMC logo with red viral particles floating around it. Credit: Spencer Phillips/EMBL, iStock

Europe PMC: unlocking the potential of COVID-19 preprints

Europe PMC has begun indexing full-text COVID-19 preprints along with the associated data. The project aims to accelerate research to fight the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Screenshot from the online SAXS course. Clement Blanchet, a senior scientist in the Svergun group at EMBL Hamburg, is presenting the P12 SAXS beamline at Petra III to the participants.

EMBL releases online course on solution scattering from biological macromolecules

The Svergun group at EMBL Hamburg has released the course ‘Solution Scattering from Biological Macromolecules’ in an online format for the first time. The course explores different aspects of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for studying the structure of macromolecules.

By Dorota Badowska

Events

Atomic model of the entire condensin complex

Understanding chromosome organisation

EMBL scientists and collaborators help reveal the process by which enormous quantities of DNA are folded into cells.

By Edward Prior

Science

EMBLetc.

Read the latest Issues of our magazine - EMBLetc.

Looking for past print editions of EMBLetc.? Browse our archive, going back 20 years.

EMBLetc. archive
Edit