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EMBL-EBI

Image of Bridge of Sighs in Cambridge, UK, with animated microbes in the river water.

Monitoring dangerous bacteria in freshwater

Freshwater sports can cause waterborne infections, but real-time DNA sequencing could…

By Oana Stroe

Science

Protein painting from 2020 PDB Art exhibition, showing two colourful proteins on different coloured backgrounds.

Discover the wonderful world of proteins: first virtual PDB Art exhibition

Schoolchildren create exquisite protein-inspired…

By Oana Stroe

Lab Matters

Haemoglobin protein structure shown over a matrix symbolising artificial intelligence

Solving the protein structure puzzle

How artificial intelligence can help us solve the mysteries of the protein…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Microscopy image of radiolarians - unicellular organisms found in the upper layers of the ocean. They are major exporters of organic carbon to the deep ocean.

Microbiomes help predict the future of the Atlantic

Microbiomes, plastics, and connectivity – AtlantECO aims to understand the fabric of the Atlantic…

By Oana Stroe

Science

An artistic image of colorful wires connected to a could database.

EOSC: shaping Europe’s digital future

EMBL’s Rupert Lück is engaged in developing the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC): the infrastructure that will support the future of data…

By Josh Tapley

Lab Matters

Four blue circular objects are surrounded with green structures, and the central blue circle with pink structures. The blue circles are human cell nuclei, and pink and green structures are proteins.

Repurposing drugs for a pan-coronavirus treatment

Scientists from the Beltrao Group at EMBL-EBI and collaborators identified drug targets common to SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and MERS-CoV, three…

By Vicky Hatch

Science

Human silhouette showing internal organs including oesophagus and stomach. Circle with DNA bases A,T, C and G superimposed.

Genome sequencing accelerates cancer detection

The Gerstung Group at EMBL-EBI and collaborators have developed a statistical model that analyses genomic data to predict whether a patient has a…

By Oana Stroe

Science

A portrait photo of Geetika Malhotra, new Head of Web Development at EMBL-EBI.

Welcome: Geetika Malhotra

The Web Development team provides a central source of web design and development for EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). In July,…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Lab Matters

A human heart sits at the centre of the illustration. The left ventricle is see-through, showing patterns of trabeculae. Around the heart are some notes from Leonardo da Vinci.

New clues to a 500-year old mystery about the human heart

An international team of scientists involving Ewan Birney's group has investigated the function of a complex mesh of muscle fibres that line the…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

The tuatara, an iguana-like reptile with a crest of spikes, sits on a forest floor.

The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril

A global team of researchers including the Flicek Team at EMBL-EBI has partnered up with the Māori tribe Ngātiwai to sequence the genome of the…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

A woman with glasses holds a book. The book cover says "Gene naming rules". Thought bubbles float around her head and display gene symbols like BRCA1.

Bagpipe and Pokemon, or how not to name a human gene

The human genome harbours about 19 000 protein-coding genes, many of which still have no known function. As scientists unveil the secrets of our DNA,…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Mosaic of microscopy images of tumour, forming two broken DNA molecules

Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that uses computer vision to analyse tissue samples from cancer patients. The…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

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