Edit

Bioinformatics

A woman with glasses holds a book. The book cover says "Gene naming rules". Thought bubbles float around her head and display gene symbols like BRCA1.

Bagpipe and Pokemon, or how not to name a human gene

The human genome harbours about 19 000 protein-coding genes, many of which still have no known function. As scientists unveil the secrets of our DNA, they come across novel genes that they need to refer to using a unique name. The Human Genome Organisation’s Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) at…

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Mosaic of microscopy images of tumour, forming two broken DNA molecules

Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that uses computer vision to analyse tissue samples from cancer patients. The algorithm can distinguish between healthy and cancerous tissues, and can also identify patterns DNA and RNA changes in tumours.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

A magnifying glass hovers over the human gut, revealing its biodiversity.

Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem

An international team of scientists has collated all known bacterial genomes from the human gut microbiome into a single large database. Their work will allow researchers to explore the links between bacterial genes and proteins, and their effects on human health.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Illustration showing globe, statistics and viruses

Funding to predict the risk of infectious disease outbreaks

European collaboration receives funding to explore risks and impact of future infectious disease outbreaks.

By Oana Stroe

Lab Matters

Artist's impression of DNA lesions. Credit: Petra Korlevic

Unpicking the complexity of DNA mutations

DNA damage caused by chemical mutagens is not repaired immediately and can create more genetic diversity in tumours.

By Oana Stroe

Science

Close-up photograph of servers at EMBL Heidelberg's data centre.

Understanding the role of our genes in SARS-CoV-2 infections

EMBL scientists will contribute to the new German COVID-19 OMICS Initiative to study the biological mechanisms contributing to coronavirus infections. EMBL group leaders Jan Korbel and Oliver Stegle, who is also affiliated with the DKFZ Heidelberg, will coordinate the set-up of IT infrastructures…

By Marius Bruer

Science

DNA damage and repair jointly leave mutational signatures in the genome.

DNA damage and faulty repair jointly cause mutations

DNA mutations are caused by a combination of DNA damage and repair, shows study by EMBL-EBI and collaborators.

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Science

Collage of images representing wet and dry lab research and healthcare

Why share data during a pandemic?

In March 2020, planes were grounded, streets went quiet, and our lives changed forever. But while the world came to a halt, many scientists were ramping up their efforts to understand the new virus.

By Oana Stroe

Science

COVID-19 Data Portal logo on globe background

EMBL-EBI launches COVID-19 Data Portal

The new collaborative space will help scientists, public health and healthcare professionals around the world to fight the coronavirus pandemic.

By Oana Stroe

Science

Analysis of human genomes in the cloud

Scientists from EMBL present a tool for large-scale analysis of genomic data with cloud computing. Main advantages of the new tool, called Butler, are continuous system monitoring and its ability to self-heal in case of failure, allowing for 43% more efficient data processing than previous…

By Mathias Jäger

Science

EMBLetc.

Read the latest Issues of our magazine - EMBLetc.

Looking for past print editions of EMBLetc.? Browse our archive, going back 20 years.

EMBLetc. archive
Edit