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Judith Zaugg and Mariana Ruiz Velasco. PHOTO: Marietta Schupp/EMBL

Loops in DNA affect which proteins are coded

EMBL scientists unveil how 3D chromatin structure affects RNA splicing

By Berta Carreño

Science

John Kendrew, c. 1978, visits the site of the EMBL main laboratory in Heidelberg. Photo taken by Frieda Glockner (EMBL Archive / DE 2324 P-GLO)

Molecular biology as a force for peace

Historian Soraya de Chadarevian explores how EMBL’s first Director General shaped molecular biology

By Sarah B. Puschmann

Lab Matters

The colour of the dots on this ATM keypad represents the amount of a molecule that was transferred from the person’s finger to the keypad.

Mapping molecules on people, fields and ATMs

Molecule mapping method raises interest in forensics, agriculture and microbiome studies

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Your favourite reads of 2017

A look back at some of the most read stories on EMBL’s news website this year

By Berta Carreño

Lab Matters

The most curious genomes in Ensebl. Credit: Spencer Phillips/EMBL-EBI

Curious genomes

What are the strangest genomes in EMBL-EBI's Ensembl?

By Mary Todd Bergman

Science

In this representation of influenza polymerase, a molecule (white) that strongly inhibits the enzyme’s activity is shown bound to the region of the enzyme (red) that usually binds the cap section of mRNA. IMAGE: EMBL/Cusack Group

Futures: Unravelling influenza

ERC grantee Stephen Cusack shares his vision for the next ten years

By Edward Dadswell

Science

Illustration of complicated datasets

The future of training

EMBL experts outline the trends shaping scientific training in the coming years

By Berta Carreño

Events

Philipp Keller’s work imaged the early development of a zebrafish embryo using light sheet microscopy

A physical revolution

EMBL physicist-turned-biologist alumni win 2017 Kendrew and Phillipson awards

By Guest author(s)

Alumni

New research reveals that without cohesin (pictured here), the chromosomes in mouse liver cells still folded on the mega-base scale but didn’t form large-scale compartments

Chromosomes don’t need key protein for all their folds

New research reveals that two different mechanisms are responsible for chromosome folding

By Sarah B. Puschmann

Science

Alasdair McDowall (left), an EMBL research technician 1978-1987, and Jacques Dubochet (right), EMBL group leader 1978-1987, together in Heidelberg

Alasdair McDowall’s slow road to flash freezing

How a research technician with a master’s degree contributed to Nobel Prize-winning work

By Sarah B. Puschmann

Alumni

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