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Fluorescence microscopy

Fluorescent microscopic image of fruit fly larva with tubular heart cells in gold and the remainder of image in magenta

Fruit fly with a heart of gold

Not just another pretty fruit fly. This magenta and golden drosophila larva is lit up with a fluorescent molecule to help researchers study heart…

By Ivy Kupec

Picture of the week

Top row: The evolution of tumour cells (green) within a normal organoid (grey) shown in three panels. Lower row: Surface rendition of tumour cells and labels new cells that arise from a single cell in the same colour.

A tool to improve cancer research

EMBL scientists have created a new, realistic 3D testbed that could help achieve the goal of stopping cancers before they start by studying cancer…

By Ivy Kupec

Science

Composite image of fly larvae organs making up a flower

From fly to flower

In this composite image, visual artist Mona Kakanj assembled three different biological structures in fly larvae into a flower. The original images…

By Marius Bruer

Picture of the week

Mouse embryonic fibroblasts and their cell skeletons

Glow-in-the-dark cell skeletons

This image shows mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), their cell skeletons (green) and nuclei (blue) under a confocal microscope, photographed by…

By Marius Bruer

Picture of the week

Claire Deo

Welcome: Claire Deo

New group leader at EMBL Heidelberg employs synthetic chemistry to develop novel tools for…

By Marius Bruer

Science

Microscope assembly

Building microscopes to learn biology

How EMBL’s ‘Microscope in Action’ introduces teenagers to the basics of fluorescence…

By Marius Bruer

Lab Matters

One-touch make-up – for our cells

The cells in the different parts of this video are always the same (grey), but, like actors using make-up to highlight different facial features,…

By Guest author(s)

Science

The Fly Digital Embryo at different developmental stages, with cell nuclei coloured according to how fast they were moving (from blue for the slowest to orange for the fastest). The fruit fly embryo is magnified around 250 times. IMAGE: Philipp Keller

Digital Embryo gains wings

The scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, who ‘fathered’ the Digital Embryo have now given it…

By Guest author(s)

Science

A full body shot of Medaka juveniles, taken by Philipp Keller, from the lab of Ernst Stelzer at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), with a newly developed microscope called Digital Scanned Laser Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscope. Picture credits: Philipp Keller, Stelzer Group, EMBL

Picture Release

‘Useless fish with big eyes’. This is what Medaka, the name of the Japanese killifish in the pictures, means in Japan where it originally…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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