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Korbel Archives | EMBL

Understanding brain tumours in children

The causes of 40 percent of all cases of certain medulloblastoma – dangerous brain tumours affecting children – are hereditary. These are the findings of a recent genetic analysis carried out by scientists from EMBL and numerous colleagues around the world.

By Mathias Jäger

Science

The Pan-Cancer project

EMBL co-leads most comprehensive study of genetic causes of cancer

By Mathias Jäger

Science

Analysis of human genomes in the cloud

Scientists from EMBL present a tool for large-scale analysis of genomic data with cloud computing. Main advantages of the new tool, called Butler, are continuous system monitoring and its ability to self-heal in case of failure, allowing for 43% more efficient data processing than previous approaches. The tool was developed for the Pan-Cancer project. The […]

By Mathias Jäger

Science

Finding genetic cancer risks

Using the data from the Pan-Cancer project EMBL scientists describe how our genetic background influences cancer development.

By Fabian Oswald

Science

Faster, cheaper and more detailed

Researchers have developed a cheaper and faster method to check for genetic differences in individual cells

By Mathias Jäger

Science

The pyramids represent chromatin domains in the wild-type situation. The reflection in the water below represents the rearrangements in the mutant fruit fly chromosomes. At first glance the (regulatory) landscapes look very similar, but there are lots of changes to the topology, and yet these have little impact on the nature of the landscape (gene expression). IMAGE: Beata Edyta Mierzwa in collaboration with EMBL.

Rearranging chromosomes

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function? EMBL scientists reveal uncoupling of 3D chromatin organisation and gene expression.

By Iris Kruijen

Science

IMAGE: Korbel group/EMBL

Catalogue of structural variants

Thorough characterisation of structural variants in human genomes

By Guest author(s)

Science

artistic impression of the double helix structure of DNA

Model to predict prostate cancer progress

Cancer researchers have developed a computer model to predict the course of disease for prostate cancer

By Guest author(s)

Science

As a cell prepares to divide, the chromosomes (shown here in pink) condense, becoming more tightly coiled and easier to observe under the microscope. The faint structure in the centre is a cell nucleus in which the chromosomes are in their usual decondensed state.

Exploring genetic variation

EMBL group leader Jan Korbel reflects on his scientific origins and current research

By Edward Dadswell

Science

MRI image of a medulloblastoma

New risk factors for rare childhood cancer

Researchers identify genes that can cause brain tumours in children and other cancers later in life

By Iris Kruijen

Science

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