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Tag:

biodiversity

Year
14 July 2022 Visualising the ocean below and above surface, showing several species and giving written details on the ocean microbiome composition

Priorities for ocean microbiome research

Science Microbial communities play essential roles in ocean ecology and planetary health. A recent publication highlights priorities for understanding and protecting ocean microbiomes.

2022

science

3 June 2021 Illustration of a rocky coastline with sailing boat, mountains, underwater organisms, bridge and factory in the background.

Living laboratories

Science Under the innovative Planetary Biology research theme, EMBL scientists aim to understand life in the context of its environment.

2021

science

24 September 2020 The conference key visual shows a variety of species engulfed by fire, reflecting the conference title, ‘Our House Is Burning: Scientific and Societal Responses to Mass Extinction’.

Dinosaurs, dodos, and the future of life on Earth

Events EMBL’s 21st Science and Society Conference will address scientific and societal responses to mass extinctions. Ahead of his keynote speech, renowned palaeontologist Mike Benton explains how looking into the deep past can give us vital insights into the future of life on Earth.

2020

events

3 November 2017 An image of Tara which was sailed around the world for four years during the Tara Oceans expedition. PHOTO by S Bollet/Tara Expeditions

Science at sea

Science A talent for organisation has taken EMBL’s Steffi Kandels-Lewis across the globe

2017

science

20 October 2016

Diving into Autumn

Events Participants learn about EMBL’s ocean biodiversity research at the Fall Gala

2016

events

1 October 2015 What do diatoms really do? Chris Bowler would like to know. IMAGE: Sebastien Colin

Marine mysteries

Science From the role of diatoms to how life evolved - scientists' pressing questions about life in the sea.

2015

science

21 April 2005

Whale bones and farm soil: Sequencing biodiversity

Science Instead of sequencing the genome of one organism, why not sequence a drop of sea water, a gram of farm soil or even a sunken whale skeleton? Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and their US collaborators have done just that, and the result is a new…

2005

science

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