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This microscopy image shows that, in a mouse embryo, MiR451 (dark purple) is produced only in the liver, where red blood cells are being formed at this developmental stage. Image credits: Kasper Rasmussen/EMBL

Making enough red blood cells

Red blood cells, the delivery men that take oxygen to cells all around the body, have short lives. To keep enough of them in circulation, the human…

By Guest author(s)

Science

These microscopy images show the region of the embryo larva that will develop into the adult fruit fly’s wing. In cells genetically manipulated so that PR-DUB cannot remove the gene-silencing tag (left), a gene which would normally be silenced becomes turned on (red) - a situation which is corrected when PR-DUB’s activity is restored (right). Image credits: J.Mueller/EMBL.

Tags on, tags off

During embryonic development, proteins called Polycomb group complexes turn genes off when and where their activity must not be present, preventing…

By Guest author(s)

Science

This image shows the 5,372 samples as dots colour-coded for the six major clusters identified by comparing gene expression profiles. The left and right panels of the figure are projections of the same three-dimensional shape viewed from two different perspectives. Image credit: Brazma / EMBL.

Variations on the genetic theme

Just like members of an orchestra are active at different times although playing the same piece of music, every cell in our body contains the same…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Each of these large images of dividing cells is composed of several microscopy images of human cells in which different individual genes were silenced. The smaller images are placed according to genes’ effects: images for genes that affect chromosomes make up the chromosomes (red/pink), while the mitotic spindle (green) is composed of images for genes that affect it. IMAGE: Thomas Walter & Mayumi Isokane / EMBL

Movies for the human genome

Name a human gene, and you’ll find a movie online showing you what happens to cells when it is switched off. This is the resource that researchers…

By Guest author(s)

Science

What makes us unique? Not only our genes

Once the human genome was sequenced in 2001, the hunt was on for the genes that make each of us unique. But scientists at the European Molecular…

By Guest author(s)

Science

The new Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) in Helsinki.

The Nordic EMBL Partnership for Molecular Medicine officially inaugurates the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland in Helsinki

Today, the Nordic EMBL Partnership for Molecular Medicine officially inaugurates the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM) in Helsinki.…

By Guest author(s)

Lab Matters

The new EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany. PHOTO: Hugo Nevers/EMBL

New training and conference centre for the life sciences at EMBL in Heidelberg

Today, the German Minister for Education and Research, Annette Schavan, officially opens the new training and conference centre for the life sciences…

By Guest author(s)

Lab Matters

Bacterial balance that keeps us healthy

The thousands of bacteria, fungi and other microbes that live in our gut are essential contributors to our good health. They break down toxins,…

By Guest author(s)

Science

MicroRNA: a glimpse into the past

The last ancestor we shared with worms, which roamed the seas around 600 million years ago, may already have had a sophisticated brain that released…

By Guest author(s)

Science

This image shows the three-dimensional structure of Death-Associated Protein Kinase (green and yellow) when bound to calmodulin (violet and blue). It was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Image credit: Mathias Wilmanns / EMBL

How to shoot the messenger

Cells rely on a range of signalling systems to communicate with each other and to control their own internal workings. Scientists from the European…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Image credit: Rachel Melwig & Christine Panagiotidis / EMBL

Membrane-coat proteins: bacteria have them too

Although they are present almost everywhere, on land and sea, a group of related bacteria in the superphylum…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Open access drug discovery database launches with half a million compounds

ChEMBLdb, a vast online database of information on the properties and activities of drugs and drug-like small molecules and their targets, launches…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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