Edit

EMBL News

beta

Chromatin Archives | EMBL

EMBL scientists investigate rare lung disease

Researchers in EMBL’s Zaugg group have studied the causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare disease that causes high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. The study, carried out in collaboration with Stanford University School of Medicine, compared lung cells of patients with the disease with those of healthy individuals. Instead of finding a single clear cause, their results showed large epigenetic disturbances.

By Fabian Oswald

Science

Dancing chromosomes

In human cells, the genetic material is packaged into 23 different DNA molecules, the chromosomes. Each chromosome is present in two copies, one inherited from the paternal sperm, and the other from the maternal egg. During most of the cell’s life, chromosomes take the shape of long, spaghetti-like molecules intertwined with each other. However, before […]

By Mehdi Khadraoui

Picture of the week

TF bound to DNA

A classification tool for transcription factors

The software diffTF quantifies activity of transcription factors and predicts their mode of action

By Fabian Oswald

Science

Choanocyte chamber of sponge, with neuroid cell

Neural pathways

Exploring the diverse routes by which EMBL scientists are driving forward neurobiology

By Cella Carr

Science

The pyramids represent chromatin domains in the wild-type situation. The reflection in the water below represents the rearrangements in the mutant fruit fly chromosomes. At first glance the (regulatory) landscapes look very similar, but there are lots of changes to the topology, and yet these have little impact on the nature of the landscape (gene expression). IMAGE: Beata Edyta Mierzwa in collaboration with EMBL.

Rearranging chromosomes

Does rearranging chromosomes affect their function? EMBL scientists reveal uncoupling of 3D chromatin organisation and gene expression.

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Molecular and behavioural consequences of the SETD5 mutation. IMAGE: Isabel Chew

Molecular and behavioural effects of SETD5 mutation

Scientists uncover effects of mutation that can cause autism and intellectual disability

By Guest author(s)

Science

In this image of developing cells, fluorescent molecules reveal DNA (blue), part of the X chromosomes (red), and the Xist RNA (white). The green colour shows a region of the cells’ nuclei called the nuclear lamina. IMAGE: Mikael Attia and Edith Heard/Institut Curie

The scientific origins of Edith Heard

EMBL’s next Director General reflects on the questions that drive her research

By Guest author(s)

Science

Information (arrows) emanating out of chromatin to give rise to different cell types. IMAGE: Campbell Medical Illustration

Chromatin usage reveals developmental trajectories

EMBL scientists show how chromatin usage in individual cells reveals developmental trajectories

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Judith Zaugg and Mariana Ruiz Velasco. PHOTO: Marietta Schupp/EMBL

Loops in DNA affect which proteins are coded

EMBL scientists unveil how 3D chromatin structure affects RNA splicing

By Berta Carreño

Science

New research reveals that without cohesin (pictured here), the chromosomes in mouse liver cells still folded on the mega-base scale but didn’t form large-scale compartments

Chromosomes don’t need key protein for all their folds

New research reveals that two different mechanisms are responsible for chromosome folding

By Sarah B. Puschmann

Science

EMBLetc.

Read the latest Issues of our magazine - EMBLetc.

Looking for past print editions of EMBLetc.? Browse our archive, going back 20 years.

EMBLetc. archive
Edit