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spindle

Artistic 3D rendering of the dual spindle in the mammalian zygote. IMAGE: Cartasiova, Hossain, Reichmann, Ellenberg/EMBL

Parental chromosomes kept apart during first division

Mammalian life begins differently than we thought…

By Iris Kruijen

Science

The cell that isn’t

This may look like yet another video of a dividing cell, but there’s a catch. You are looking at chromosomes (red) being pulled apart by the mitotic spindle (green), but it’s not a cell, because there’s no cell membrane. Like a child sucking an egg out of its shell, Ivo Telley from the…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Circling chromosomes. Chromosomes (blue) form a ‘belt’ around the centre of the spindle (green), discovered by the EMBL scientists.

Fishing games gone wrong

When an egg cell is being formed, the cellular machinery which separates chromosomes is extremely imprecise at fishing them out of the cell’s interior, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have discovered. The unexpected degree of trial-and-error…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Constant overlap

During cell division, microtubules emanating from each of the spindle poles meet and overlap in the spindle’s midzone. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have uncovered the molecular mechanism that determines the extent of this overlap. In a…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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