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cryo-ET

This visual representation shows the newly identified architecture (left) of the coupled molecular machines responsible for transcription (green; DNA in magenta) and translation (blue and yellow), accompanied by the protein interaction network from mass spectrometry (centre) and the cryo-electron tomography data (right) from Mycoplasma pneumoniae that was used to model the structure. Credit: Liang Xue and Julia Mahamid/EMBL

Visualising the cell’s molecular machinery in action

A new approach that allows researchers to see molecular machinery at work inside cells has offered a deeper understanding of how bacteria produce proteins and a unique glimpse into how they respond to antibiotics.

By Ivy Kupec

Science

The retromer complex

Solving the structure of retromer

Retromer’s 3D structure improves understanding of cellular sorting and packaging

By Guest author(s)

Science

The closest look ever at native human tissue

Seeing proteins in their natural environment and interactions inside cells has been a longstanding goal. Using an advanced microscopy technique called cryo-electron tomography, researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) have visualised proteins responsible for cell-cell…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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