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X-ray crystallography

Picture showing MD3, the micro-diffractometer developed by the Instrumentation team, installed at one of the EMBL Hamburg's beamline. Credits: Kinga Lubowiecka/EMBL

Structural biology at EMBL: driving technology development

Florent Cipriani, who recently retired as Head of the Instrumentation Team after a long career at EMBL Grenoble, is one of the pioneers of…

By Mylène André

Lab Matters

A model of Glycine Transporter 1, which is located in the cell membrane. In its lower-middle part, it is bound by its inhibitor, which is a much smaller molecule. At its top, Glycine Transporter 1 is bound by a synthetic mini-antibody, called a sybody.

New perspectives for treating psychiatric disorders

Scientists have determined the structure of Glycine Transporter 1. The finding could open new avenues for developing therapeutics for psychiatric…

By Dorota Badowska

Science

A close-up photo of a shiny droplet of liquid that has been placed into one of the wells of a crystallisation plate.

Droplet beauty

Scientists at EMBL Hamburg use droplets of protein solution to grow protein crystals. By exposing the crystals to X-rays, they are able to determine…

By Dorota Badowska

Picture of the week

Circular beamline building, surrounded by illuminated Grenoble city in the evening and the alps in the background.

Upgraded beamlines at EMBL Grenoble unveiled

The beamlines run jointly by EMBL Grenoble and the ESRF reopen today, unveiling significant upgrades that exploit the brand new fourth generation…

By Mylène André

Science

Crystal selection for X-ray diffraction experiments.

Investigating the structure and mechanisms of coronavirus biomolecules

While global research on coronaviruses has shed light on the function of many SARS-CoV-2 proteins, the role of some crucial components remains…

By Adam Gristwood

Science

Automated sample changer and diffractometer at the ID30B X-ray crystallography beamline at ESRF Grenoble.

Facilitating COVID-19 structural biology research

EMBL and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) restart the activities of the Joint Structural Biology Group in Grenoble to support…

By Marius Bruer

Science

Liquid handling robot transfering protein crystalisation solutions

Responding to health threats posed by coronaviruses

By re-opening the High-Throughput Crystallisation (HTX) lab at EMBL Grenoble, EMBL is supporting structural biology projects to respond to the health…

By Sara Verstraeten

Science

Close-up view of the interior of a protein analytics system

Exploring synthetic antibodies to stop coronavirus

Scientists at EMBL Hamburg and Karolinska Institutet Stockholm aim to find synthetic antibodies – known as nanobodies – that bind a surface…

By Marius Bruer

Science

This image shows the three-dimensional structure of Death-Associated Protein Kinase (green and yellow) when bound to calmodulin (violet and blue). It was obtained by X-ray crystallography. Image credit: Mathias Wilmanns / EMBL

How to shoot the messenger

Cells rely on a range of signalling systems to communicate with each other and to control their own internal workings. Scientists from the European…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Drought resistance explained

Much as adrenaline coursing through our veins drives our body’s reactions to stress, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is behind plants’…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Raising the alarm when DNA goes bad

Our genome is constantly under attack from things like UV light and toxins, which can damage or even break DNA strands and ultimately lead to cancer…

By Guest author(s)

Science

The giant protein titin helps build muscles

Imagine grabbing two snakes by the tail so that they can’t wriggle off in opposite directions. Scientists at the Hamburg Outstation of the…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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