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Microglia

Choanocyte chamber of sponge, with neuroid cell

Neural pathways

Exploring the diverse routes by which EMBL scientists are driving forward neurobiology…

By Cella Carr

Science

Multiple synapse heads send out filopodia (green) converging on one microglia (red), as seen by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIBSEM).

Captured: microglia nibbling on brain synapses

For the first time, EMBL Rome researchers have captured microglia nibbling on brain synapses on film.…

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Making your brain social

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about. In a study published online today…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Microglial cells

Locating ground zero

Like emergency workers rushing to a disaster scene, cells called microglia speed to places where the brain has been injured, to contain the damage by ‘eating up’ any cellular debris and dead or dying neurons. Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany,…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Microglia (green) in a mouse brain. The nuclei of all cells in the brain are labelled blue. Credit: EMBL/ R.Paolicelli

Gardening in the brain

Gardeners know that some trees require regular pruning: some of their branches have to be cut so that others can grow stronger. The same is true of the developing brain: cells called microglia prune the connections between neurons, shaping how the brain is wired, scientists at the European…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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