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stem cells neurons differentiation

From stem cells to neurons

Scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have investigated stem cells and how they differentiate to become neurons. Their approach included an assessment of the…

By Fabian Oswald

Science

Gene Editing and Embryology Facility at EMBL Rome

Editing the mouse genome to study SARS-CoV-2 infection

To study how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells, the Gene Editing and Embryology Facility (GEEF) at EMBL Rome will generate mice that express a human version…

By Rossana De Lorenzi

Science

Cell division

Tracing the origins of cells

Researchers from the Sharpe group at EMBL Barcelona have published a method to track the developmental history of a cell using the gene editing tool…

By Fabian Oswald

Science

Formation of a brain

The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. Yet despite it being the organ that makes us conscious beings – and despite the fact that…

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

DNA’s twisted communication

During embryo development, genes are dynamically, and very precisely, switched on and off to confer different properties to different cells and build…

By Guest author(s)

Science

A slice through the tails of mouse sperm.

Picture release: Spring tails

As spring arrives, flowers seem to bloom everywhere – even under the microscopes at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg,…

By Guest author(s)

Picture of the week

The informant: a jumping gene

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have developed a new method for studying gene regulation, by…

By Guest author(s)

Science

These microscopy images demonstrate the effects of Notch signalling on the hearts of newborn mice (top) and of adult mice after a heart attack (bottom). In a normal neonatal heart (top left), the two major heart chambers (ventricles) are clearly separated by tissue (septum). But when Notch signalling was inactivated in an embryo’s heart muscle cells, the septum between the ventricles of the newborn mouse’s heart was incomplete (asterisk). The same defect commonly occurs in humans with congenital heart disease, often leading to circulatory distress. In the images of adult hearts (bottom), healthy tissue is shown in red and damaged tissue in blue. Normally (bottom left), a heart attack causes extensive tissue damage to the left ventricle (right-hand cavity), but mice in which Notch was re-activated after the heart attack had reduced tissue damage (bottom right) and improved cardiac function. Image credit: EMBL

From fruit fly wings to heart failure. Why Not(ch)?

Almost a century after it was discovered in fruit flies with notches in their wings, the Notch signalling pathway may come to play an important role…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Getting to the bottom of memory

Phone numbers, the way to work, granny’s birthday – our brain with its finite number of nerve cells can store incredible amounts of…

By Guest author(s)

Science

Getting to the heart of cardiovascular diseases

Today three research organisations announce the merging of their expertise to fight cardiovascular diseases, which are among the most common health…

By Guest author(s)

Lab Matters

How do cells travel through our bodies?

One of the most basic yet least understood processes in our bodies is how cells crawl along tissues. This behavior is essential to the formation of…

By Guest author(s)

Science

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