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Morphogenesis

Sea anemone polyp in side view showing two arms.

Crazy arms

Sea anemones are amazing creatures. Despite their plant-like appearance and their tendency to remain fixed in one spot, they are actually…

By Mathias Jäger

Picture of the week

Super-resolution image of the basal surface of a cellularising Drosophila embryo.

Actin crosslinking plays key role in tissue morphogenesis

New insights into mechanisms behind embryonic…

By Cella Carr

Science

The robots used during the experiments. The shape of this particular swarm is a hand-made illustration of the technique. PHOTO: reprinted with permission from AAAS

Hundreds of tiny robots grow bio-inspired shapes

Scientists build self-organising features into robot swarms to study shape…

By Iris Kruijen

Science

EMBL scientists extend Turing’s theory to help understand how biological patterns are created. IMAGE - Xavier Diego, EMBL

New insights into Turing patterns

EMBL scientists extend Turing’s theory to help understand how biological patterns are…

By Berta Carreño

Science

Three examples of the tissue shapes the team created. The black and white square, circle and triangle on the left correspond to the cells that were illuminated. On the right, three fruit fly embryos are shown in cyan, magenta and yellow, demonstrating how the illuminated cells folded inwards after the light-activation. IMAGE: Stefano De Renzis, EMBL

Constructing new tissue shapes with light

EMBL researchers guide the shape of cells and tissues with…

By Iris Kruijen

Science

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