EMBL Seminars

At EMBL, experts from institutes throughout the world speak on a wide range of scientific and technical topics

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29 February 2024, 11:00

Capturing transcription factors in their native chromatin environment

29 February 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Grenoble, Virtual

AbstractTranscription factors TFs distinctly mark genes for expression and are the pillars of cell identity Yet even at the basic level of DNA recognition by TFs we know little about how this is achieved Eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around histone proteins to form nucleosomes which occlude large parts of the DNA surface While it has been long known that some TFs engage DNA motifs when hidden... AbstractTranscription factors (TFs) distinctly mark genes for expression and are the pillars of cell identity. Yet, even at the basic level of DNA recognition by TFs, we know little about how this is achieved. Eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around histone proteins to form nucleosomes which occlude large parts of the DNA surface. While it has been long known that some TFs engage DNA motifs when ‘hidden’ in chromatin, the mechanisms have remained elusive. I will describe our recent structural insights into how diverse TFs, involved in circadian rhythms, read out specific DNA sequences within a chromatinized genome. Using the green alga, Chlamydomonas, as an ideal model system for circadian and chromatin biology, I will further detail our recent efforts using cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) to elucidate the circadian-controlled structural transitions of chromatin complexes in situ.About the...

Speaker(s): Alicia Michael, Biozentrum/IST, Austria
Host: Wojtek Galej

Place: EMBL Grenoble Seminar Room

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Grenoble, Virtual

Additional information

Abstract
Transcription factors (TFs) distinctly mark genes for expression and are the pillars of cell identity. Yet, even at the basic level of DNA recognition by TFs, we know little about how this is achieved. Eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around histone proteins to form nucleosomes which occlude large parts of the DNA surface. While it has been long known that some TFs engage DNA motifs when ‘hidden’ in chromatin, the mechanisms have remained elusive. I will describe our recent structural insights into how diverse TFs, involved in circadian rhythms, read out specific DNA sequences within a chromatinized genome. Using the green alga, Chlamydomonas, as an ideal model system for circadian and chromatin biology, I will further detail our recent efforts using cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) to elucidate the circadian-controlled structural transitions of chromatin complexes in situ.

About the speaker
Alicia completed her Ph.D. thesis research under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Partch studying transcriptional regulation within the mammalian circadian clock at the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA. Following her PhD, she moved to Switzerland as an HFSP and EMBO postdoctoral fellow at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, where she was advised by Dr. Nicolas Thomä, and began studies examining transcription factor engagement with chromatin. She currently works at the University of Basel, Biozentrum with Dr. Ben Engel investigating the structural transitions of chromatin within cells using cryo-electron tomography. In Spring 2024, Alicia will open the Chromatin Structure and Rhythms lab at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA).

Meet the speaker
To meet with the speaker informally after the talks,sign up here [add link]. We especially encourage predocs and postdocs to take advantage of this opportunity.

Attachments
[Link to a file (for example a pdf of the seminar’s programme) - the file can be uploaded on the intranet]

Connection details
Zoom*: https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/98711569484?pwd=aURMS3U1NUVWNUJJRk0vakNEeHVRQT09  (Meeting ID: 987 1156 9484, Password: 636147)

Please note that the talk will not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


1 March 2024, 11:00

Manipulation of facilitators and barriers of cell identity

1 March 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Rome

About the speakerStefan Stricker serves as the head of the Epigenetic Engineering group at the Institute of Stem Cell Research and holds the position of Professor of Reprogramming and Regeneration at the Biomedical Center of LMU Munich He completed his undergraduate studies in Biology in Munich and earned his Ph D from the University of Vienna in Austria During his time at the Center for... About the speakerStefan Stricker serves as the head of the Epigenetic Engineering group at the Institute of Stem Cell Research and holds the position of Professor of Reprogramming and Regeneration at the Biomedical Center of LMU Munich. He completed his undergraduate studies in Biology in Munich and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Vienna in Austria. During his time at the Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) in Vienna, he focused on the epigenetic control of genes regulating embryonic growth.Subsequently, during his PostDoc positions at Cambridge University and UCL London, he conducted research into how epigenetics can influence the tumorigenicity of brain tumor cells. In his current role, Prof. Stricker's research group at the Institute for Stem Cell Research is dedicated to unravelling the molecular mechanisms that govern cell identities. To achieve this, his...

Speaker(s): Stefan Stricker, LMU München, Helmholtz Zentrum, Germany, Germany
Host: Mathieu Boulard and Jamie Hackett

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Rome

Additional information

About the speaker
Stefan Stricker serves as the head of the Epigenetic Engineering group at the Institute of Stem Cell Research and holds the position of Professor of Reprogramming and Regeneration at the Biomedical Center of LMU Munich. 

He completed his undergraduate studies in Biology in Munich and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Vienna in Austria. During his time at the Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) in Vienna, he focused on the epigenetic control of genes regulating embryonic growth.

Subsequently, during his PostDoc positions at Cambridge University and UCL London, he conducted research into how epigenetics can influence the tumorigenicity of brain tumor cells. In his current role, Prof. Stricker's research group at the Institute for Stem Cell Research is dedicated to unravelling the molecular mechanisms that govern cell identities. To achieve this, his laboratory pioneers innovative technologies based on direct cell fate reprogramming, CRISPR and single-cell sequencing.

 


12 March 2024, 10:00

EMBL Olink Seminar

12 March 20242024Company RepresentativeEMBL Heidelberg

Abstract Olink technology enables precise and multiplexed measurement of protein biomarkers offering valuable insights into complexbiological processes and facilitating the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets The Olink technology is based on proximity extension assays PEA It involves two matched antibodies labeled with unique DNA oligonucleotides binding to a target protein... Abstract[Olink technology enables precise and multiplexed measurement of protein biomarkers, offering valuable insights into complexbiological processes and facilitating the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The Olink technology is based on proximity extension assays (PEA). It involves two matched antibodies labeled with unique DNA oligonucleotides binding to a target protein, allowing their DNA oligonucleotides to hybridize and create a double-stranded DNA "barcode" proportional to the target protein's concentration. This is followed by PCR amplification, with readout options including quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or next-generation sequencing (NGS). As we recently set up the Olink Explore protein analysis platform at the EMBL GeneCore as part of an EMBL-GSK collaborative project, we are now happy to host Angela Garding from Olink, who will...

Speaker(s): Angela Garding, Business Development Manager/DACH, Olink Proteomics AB Metabolomic, NOT SPECIFIED | Ujjwal Neogi, PhD Associate Professor of Virology, Karolinska Institute | H. Chris Eberl, Associate Director Omics Sciences, Cellzome a GSK company
Host: Vivianne Heins, Genomics Core Facility

Place: Small Operon (Join the VC)

Company Representative

EMBL Heidelberg

Additional information

Abstract
[Olink technology enables precise and multiplexed measurement of protein biomarkers, offering valuable insights into complexbiological processes and facilitating the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. The Olink technology is based on proximity extension assays (PEA). It involves two matched antibodies labeled with unique DNA oligonucleotides binding to a target protein, allowing their DNA oligonucleotides to hybridize and create a double-stranded DNA "barcode" proportional to the target protein's concentration. This is followed by PCR amplification, with readout options including quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or next-generation sequencing (NGS). 

As we recently set up the Olink Explore protein analysis platform at the EMBL GeneCore as part of an EMBL-GSK collaborative project, we are now happy to host Angela Garding from Olink, who will provide an introductory overview of its diverse application domains to EMBL scientists.

Additionally, Dr. Ujjwal Neogi from the Karolinska Institute will share insights from his extensive multi-omics investigations on HIV, incorporating Olink proteomics analyses. Concluding our seminar, Dr. H. Christian Eberl from Cellzome will offer perspectives on utilizing the Olink platform for analyzing the secretome of cell culture supernatants. 

The session will also provide an opportunity for attendees to engage in a Q&A session and discuss potential project ideas. 

“Olink Proteomics - Capture true Biological Insights. Protein by Protein. At any Scale." Speaker: Dr. Angela Garding, Business Development Manager/DACH

“Olink Proteomics AB Metabolomic Modeling for Enhanced Risk Stratification and Disease Phenotyping in Chronic Infectious Diseases” Speaker: Dr. Ujjwal Neogi, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Virology, Karolinska Institute 

“Olink analysis monitors the secretome of cell culture supernatants” Speaker: Chris Eberl, Associate Director Omics Sciences, Cellzome a GSK company

Connection details: prior registration is required
Zoom*: [link] (Meeting ID: [94454552321], Password: [XXXXXXX])


13 March 2024, 11:00

Expansion microscopy for structural cell biology: from centriole architecture to human diseases.

13 March 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Grenoble

AbstractThe centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division cellular signaling and cell motility This organelle of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins some of which have been associated with human diseases How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture... AbstractThe centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division, cellular signaling and cell motility. This organelle, of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins, some of which have been associated with human diseases. How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture and how associated mutations could be involved in pathologies is still poorly understood. In this seminar, I will present the latest work from my laboratory, which tackle these fundamental structural cell biology questions using cryo-tomography, cell biology and our newly developed ultrastructure expansion microscopy (U-ExM) method.About the speakerVirginie Hamel (previously Hachet) is an expert in Cell Biology and Biochemistry. She completed her PhD under the supervision of Iain Mattaj at EMBL...

Speaker(s): Virginie Hamel, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Host: Kristina Djinovic Carugo

Place: EMBL Grenoble Seminar Room

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Grenoble

Additional information

Abstract
The centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division, cellular signaling and cell motility. This organelle, of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins, some of which have been associated with human diseases. How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture and how associated mutations could be involved in pathologies is still poorly understood. In this seminar, I will present the latest work from my laboratory, which tackle these fundamental structural cell biology questions using cryo-tomography, cell biology and our newly developed ultrastructure expansion microscopy (U-ExM) method.

About the speaker
Virginie Hamel (previously Hachet) is an expert in Cell Biology and Biochemistry. She completed her PhD under the supervision of Iain Mattaj at EMBL (Heidelberg, Germany, 2004) working on the role of importin alpha in nuclear envelope re-assembly in vitro using Xenopus laevis egg extracts. From 2005 to 2015, she worked as a post-doctoral fellow and then scientist collaborator in the laboratory of Prof. Gönczy at EPFL (Lausanne, Switzerland) where she first studied timing of mitotic entry in C. elegans embryos followed by dissecting the mechanisms of centriole assembly both in vitro and in vivo. Since 2015, she is co-heading the Centriole architecture lab with Prof Paul Guichard in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Department at the University of Geneva. Their lab focuses on deciphering the structural mechanisms governing centriole assembly combining the use of cell biology methods, in vitro reconstitution assays, cryo-microscopy/cryo-tomography and expansion microscopy.

Meet the speaker
To meet with the speaker informally after the talks, please contact administration@embl.fr. We especially encourage predocs and postdocs to take advantage of this opportunity.

Attachments
[Link to a file (for example a pdf of the seminar’s programme) - the file can be uploaded on the intranet]

Connection details
Zoom*: https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/95432724854?pwd=NnJvUWU5dzU0L1NheEM2SFlQM3FPQT09(Meeting ID: 954 3272 4854, Password: Passcode: 765338)

Please note that the talk will yes/not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


15 March 2024, 11:00

Infection Biology TT. To be announced

15 March 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg, Virtual

Abstract Text for abstract About the speaker Biographical information about the speaker Connection detailsZoom https embl org zoom us j 98246952453 pwd M1Zva0pQK0t0L0lsOXA4ZEZzaWllQT09Meeting ID 982 4695 2453 Passcode 595820 Please note that the talk will not be recorded For the FAQ section as a zoom participant please use either the chat function the host will read out your question o... Abstract[Text for abstract].About the speaker[Biographical information about the speaker].Connection detailsZoom* https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/98246952453?pwd=M1Zva0pQK0t0L0lsOXA4ZEZzaWllQT09Meeting ID: 982 4695 2453 Passcode: 595820 Please note that the talk will not be recorded.*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.

Speaker(s): Vivek Thacker, Heidelberg University hospital, Germany
Host: Nassos Typas

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg, Virtual

Additional information

Abstract
[Text for abstract].

About the speaker
[Biographical information about the speaker].

Connection details
Zoom* https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/98246952453?pwd=M1Zva0pQK0t0L0lsOXA4ZEZzaWllQT09

Meeting ID: 982 4695 2453 
Passcode: 595820 

Please note that the talk will not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


15 March 2024, 13:00

Studies of magnetosome-associated protein-mineral interactions

15 March 20242024Hamburg SpeakerEMBL Hamburg

...

Speaker(s): Raz Zarivach, Ben Gurion University, Israel, Germany
Host: Meytal Landau

Place: Seminar Room 48e

Hamburg Speaker

EMBL Hamburg


22 March 2024, 11:00

Zebrafish to model neurodevelopmental toxicity resulting from perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals

22 March 20242024Human Ecosystems EMBL Rome

AbstractPersistent environmental pollutants are found abundantly in our ecosystems due to their long half life These pollutants can affect early development of human babies due to perinatal exposure in uteroand or via breast milk To evaluate the association between perinatal exposure to 27 potentialendocrine disrupting chemicals EDCs and autism spectrum disorder ASD among Norwegianchildren... AbstractPersistent environmental pollutants are found abundantly in our ecosystems due to their long half-life.These pollutants can affect early development of human babies due to perinatal exposure in uteroand/or via breast milk. To evaluate the association between perinatal exposure to 27 potentialendocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among Norwegianchildren, data were analyzed from 1,199 mother-child pairs enrolled in the prospective birth-cohort,HUMIS (Human Milk Study, 2002-2009). Breastmilk levels of 27 chemicals were measured:polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, andperfluoroalkyl substances as a proxy for perinatal exposure. One compound, β-Hexachlorocyclohexane(β-HCH) was the only chemical associated with ASD, after adjusting for 26 other chemicals. We theninvestigated the effect of β-HCH, on...

Speaker(s): Camila Vicencio Esguerra, University of Oslo, Norway
Host: Cornelius Gross

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

Human Ecosystems

EMBL Rome

Additional information

Abstract
Persistent environmental pollutants are found abundantly in our ecosystems due to their long half-life.

These pollutants can affect early development of human babies due to perinatal exposure in utero

and/or via breast milk. To evaluate the association between perinatal exposure to 27 potential

endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among Norwegian

children, data were analyzed from 1,199 mother-child pairs enrolled in the prospective birth-cohort,

HUMIS (Human Milk Study, 2002-2009). Breastmilk levels of 27 chemicals were measured:

polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and

perfluoroalkyl substances as a proxy for perinatal exposure. One compound, β-Hexachlorocyclohexane

(β-HCH) was the only chemical associated with ASD, after adjusting for 26 other chemicals. We then

investigated the effect of β-HCH, on neurodevelopment in vivo, using zebrafish. Experiments were

performed on zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) exposed to β-HCH within the first hours of fertilization, to

model in utero exposure, and repeated follow up doses, to model exposure via breast milk. The effects

of β-HCH on touch response, locomotion and social behavior were tested in larvae between 3- to 7

days post-exposure. Furthermore, alterations of brain cell proliferation and dopaminergic neuronal

cluster size in the hypothalamus were measured after exposure to a range of concentrations of β-HCH.

While β-HCH had no effect on locomotion, larvae showed an impairment in their ability to maintain a

balanced posture, and reduced social behavior with cognates, as indicated by an increased interindividual

distance in a shoaling assay. In the optic tectum, the presence of β-HCH increased the

number of proliferative cells. A reduced size of the tyrosine hydroxylase cluster in the hypothalamic

region suggested the involvement of the dopaminergic population in the effects of β-HCH. This was

confirmed by the observation that the reduction in neuronal cluster size could be prevented by the

simultaneous addition of L-dopa to the embryo bath medium. These findings highlight the adverse

outcomes persistent organic pollutants can have on the developing vertebrate brain.


5 April 2024, 14:00

Dissecting the Wood-Ljungdahl Pathway - Molecular Basis of Acetogenesis

5 April 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg, Virtual

AbstractResearch in our laboratory is focused on unravelling the diverse and ingenious mechanisms that nature has evolved to capture and utilise the greenhouse gas CO2 for biochemical processes Among the often overlooked heroes of CO2 fixation with significant ecological and biotechnological importance are anaerobic bacteria and archaea In particular acetogens are a specialised group of... AbstractResearch in our laboratory is focused on unravelling the diverse and ingenious mechanisms that nature has evolved to capture and utilise the greenhouse gas CO2 for biochemical processes. Among the often overlooked heroes of CO2 fixation, with significant ecological and biotechnological importance, are anaerobic bacteria and archaea. In particular, acetogens are a specialised group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that excel at converting CO2 to acetic acid using electrons derived from molecular hydrogen (H2) or carbon monoxide (CO), major components of industrial waste gases, making them promising candidates for carbon recycling processes.In recent years, our research has focused on exploring the key molecular machinery involved in acetogenesis. Using redox-controlled cryo-EM, we have uncovered common principles in acetogenic lifestyles, highlighting the central role of...

Speaker(s): Jan Schuller, Philipps universitat Marburg, Germany
Host: Julia Mahamid

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg, Virtual

Additional information

Abstract
Research in our laboratory is focused on unravelling the diverse and ingenious mechanisms that nature has evolved to capture and utilise the greenhouse gas CO2 for biochemical processes. Among the often overlooked heroes of CO2 fixation, with significant ecological and biotechnological importance, are anaerobic bacteria and archaea. In particular, acetogens are a specialised group of strictly anaerobic bacteria that excel at converting CO2 to acetic acid using electrons derived from molecular hydrogen (H2) or carbon monoxide (CO), major components of industrial waste gases, making them promising candidates for carbon recycling processes.

In recent years, our research has focused on exploring the key molecular machinery involved in acetogenesis. Using redox-controlled cryo-EM, we have uncovered common principles in acetogenic lifestyles, highlighting the central role of enzymatically decorated nanowires and redox-induced conformational changes. This knowledge enhances our understanding of how acetogens thrive in conditions at the thermodynamic limit of life, similar to the environment on early Earth where life evolved in the absence of oxygen.
 

About the speaker
 

Connection details
Zoom*:https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/93375363125?pwd=aXQyOUhDTXlXcERCcXpVK1NXRnFkQT09

Meeting ID: 933 7536 3125 
Passcode: 803311 

Please note that the talk will not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


11 April 2024, 11:00

To be announced

11 April 20242024Human Ecosystems EMBL Heidelberg

...

Speaker(s): John Colbourne, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

Place: Large Operon

Human Ecosystems

EMBL Heidelberg


11 April 2024, 16:00

Bringing Biofabrication into Biology and Medicine

11 April 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

...

Speaker(s): Jason A. Burdick, BioFrontiers Institute Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering University of Colorado Boulder, USA | EMBO Building - Room MR 308 - third floor, ,
Host: Fiona Watt

Place: all EMBL HD

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


25 April 2024, 11:00

The Wonders of Small Molecule Transport

25 April 20242024PSB SeminarEMBL Grenoble

AbstractTransporting small molecules across cell membranes is an essential process in cell physiology The uptake of glucose and the maintenance of intracellular pH are two fundamental processes carried out by most cells Here I will present our multidisciplinary approach that has revealed important insights into the mechanism of glucose GLUT uptake and Na H exchange which are important... AbstractTransporting small molecules across cell membranes is an essential process in cell physiology. The uptake of glucose and the maintenance of intracellular pH are two fundamental processes carried out by most cells. Here, I will present our multidisciplinary approach that has revealed important insights into the mechanism of glucose (GLUT) uptake and Na+/H+ exchange, which are important transport systems for our cells to utilize glucose as an energy source and for the regulation cytoplasmic and organellar pH. I will also present our recent structural insights into a sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger regulated by voltage – transforming the transporter into a signaling cascade that is essential in animals (metazoa) for sperm motility and fertilization. Nature (2023). 623:193–201; Nature. (2020) 578 (7794):321-325; Nature (2015) 526(7573):397-401; Nature (2013) 501(7468):573-7.About the...

Speaker(s): David Drew, Stockholm University, Sweden
Host: Andrew McCarthy

Place: IBS Seminar Room

PSB Seminar

EMBL Grenoble

Additional information

Abstract
Transporting small molecules across cell membranes is an essential process in cell physiology. The uptake of glucose and the maintenance of intracellular pH are two fundamental processes carried out by most cells. Here, I will present our multidisciplinary approach that has revealed important insights into the mechanism of glucose (GLUT) uptake and Na+/H+ exchange, which are important transport systems for our cells to utilize glucose as an energy source and for the regulation cytoplasmic and organellar pH. I will also present our recent structural insights into a sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger regulated by voltage – transforming the transporter into a signaling cascade that is essential in animals (metazoa) for sperm motility and fertilization. Nature (2023). 623:193–201; Nature. (2020) 578 (7794):321-325; Nature (2015) 526(7573):397-401; Nature (2013) 501(7468):573-7.

About the speaker
Prof. David Drew hails from New Zealand where he obtained a MSc in Chemistry from Auckland University. He joined the lab of Prof. de Gier at Stockholm University for his PhD thesis research where he developed a technique of using GFP to monitor membrane protein topology and over expression in E. coli. After a EMBO post-doc fellowship at Imperial College London, he started his own research group as a University Royal Society (URF) Fellow at Imperial, focusing on structural studies of glucose (GLUT) transporters. In 2013, Drew returned to Stockholm University where he currently resides as a Wallenberg Scholar. Drew is internationally recognized by his pioneering structural studies of glucose transporters and Na+/H+ exchangers, membrane protein GFP-based methods, and influential reviews on small molecule transport. Drew has been acknowledged with several prizes, including the Göran Gustafsson Prize in Chemistry from the Swedish Royal Academy of Science, the Arrhenius medal from the Swedish Chemistry Society and EMBO membership.

Connection details
Zoom*: https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/96262723506?pwd=L1BNci9CcFNkREU5ZEpqUXZ1YTR1dz09

(Meeting ID: [962 6272 3506], Password: [753770])

Please note that the talk will not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


26 April 2024, 11:00

Careers in industry R&D: big pharma vs biotech start-ups

26 April 20242024Career EventEMBL Heidelberg

...

Speaker(s): Carina Hasenöhrl, Principal Scientist, Boehringer Ingelheim, Austria, Austria | Sylwia Gawrzak, Translational Scientist, Silence Therapeutics

Place: Virtual seminar (Join the VC)

Career Event

EMBL Heidelberg


10 May 2024, 11:00

To be announced

10 May 20242024EMBL - Sapienza LectureEMBL Rome

...

Speaker(s): Giampiero Schiavo, UK DEMENTIA RESEARCH INSTITUTE AT UCL, United Kingdom

Place: Sapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma

EMBL - Sapienza Lecture

EMBL Rome


24 May 2024, 13:00

To be announced

24 May 20242024Hamburg SpeakerEMBL Hamburg

...

Speaker(s): Giuliana Tromba, Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy
Host: Elizabeth Duke

Place: Seminar Room 48e

Hamburg Speaker

EMBL Hamburg


31 May 2024, 11:00

To be announced

31 May 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Rome

...

Speaker(s): Michael Weber, Biotechnology and Cell Signalling | BSC - CNRS - Université de Strasbourg, France
Host: Mathieu Boulard

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Rome


7 June 2024, 10:00

To be announced

7 June 20242024EMBL Distinguished Visitor LectureEMBL Rome

...

Speaker(s): David McCormick, University of Oregon, USA
Host: Hiroki Asari

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture

EMBL Rome