EMBL Seminars

At EMBL, experts from institutes throughout the world speak on a wide range of scientific and technical topics

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31 May 2024, 11:00

Regulation of DNA methylation during mouse development

31 May 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Rome

AbstractDNA methylation occurs on CpGs in mammalian genomes and catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases DNMTs It is dynamically reprogrammed during embryonic development and is essential to establish long term repression of evolutionarily young retrotransposons and CpG rich promoters of germline genes in embryos A second wave of DNA methylation reprogramming occurs in primordial germ cells PGCs... AbstractDNA methylation occurs on CpGs in mammalian genomes and catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). It is dynamically reprogrammed during embryonic development and is essential to establish long term repression of evolutionarily young retrotransposons and CpG-rich promoters of germline genes in embryos. A second wave of DNA methylation reprogramming occurs in primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGCs undergo global erasure of DNA methylation with delayed demethylation of germline genes and selective retention of DNA methylation at retrotransposons. However, the molecular mechanisms of persistent DNA methylation in PGCs remain unclear. I will present evidence that the resistance to DNA methylation reprogramming in PGCs requires DNMT1 and UHRF2, the paralog of the DNMT1 cofactor UHRF1. PGCs from Uhrf2 knock-out mice show loss of retrotransposon DNA methylation. Furthermore,...

Speaker(s): Michael Weber, Biotechnology and Cell Signalling | BSC - CNRS - Université de Strasbourg, France
Host: Mathieu Boulard

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Rome

Additional information

Abstract
DNA methylation occurs on CpGs in mammalian genomes and catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). It is dynamically reprogrammed during embryonic development and is essential to establish long term repression of evolutionarily young retrotransposons and CpG-rich promoters of germline genes in embryos. A second wave of DNA methylation reprogramming occurs in primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGCs undergo global erasure of DNA methylation with delayed demethylation of germline genes and selective retention of DNA methylation at retrotransposons. However, the molecular mechanisms of persistent DNA methylation in PGCs remain unclear. I will present evidence that the resistance to DNA methylation reprogramming in PGCs requires DNMT1 and UHRF2, the paralog of the DNMT1 cofactor UHRF1. PGCs from Uhrf2 knock-out mice show loss of retrotransposon DNA methylation. Furthermore, Uhrf2-deficient PGCs show precocious demethylation of germline genes and overexpress meiotic genes in females. Subsequently, Uhrf2-deficient mice show impaired oocyte development and female-specific infertility. These findings reveal a crucial function for the UHRF1 paralog UHRF2 in controlling DNA methylation in the germline.
 


7 June 2024, 10:00

Neural Mechanisms of Optimal Performance

7 June 20242024EMBL Distinguished Visitor LectureEMBL Rome

AbstractOptimal performance in which a task is completed quickly and accurately is difficult to achieve and maintain Is this because the neural pathways underlying the performance need to be accurately tuned through plasticity or is it because of variability in the state of the brain Here we present evidence that waking mice are constantly in a state of flux ranging from a state of low... AbstractOptimal performance, in which a task is completed quickly and accurately, is difficult to achieve and maintain.  Is this because the neural pathways underlying the performance need to be accurately tuned through plasticity, or is it because of variability in the state of the brain?  Here we present evidence that waking mice are constantly in a state of flux – ranging from a state of low arousal and inattentiveness, to high arousal and stress.  The optimal state for performance of sensory detection or discrimination tasks lies in the middle – optimally aroused, attentive, and appropriately activated, but to some degree relaxed.  Rapid variations in the waking state of the animal, which occur on time scales as short as 10s of milliseconds, involve an interaction of the thalamus and cerebral cortex, controlled by neurotransmitter pathways that remain to be...

Speaker(s): David McCormick, University of Oregon, USA
Host: Hiroki Asari

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture

EMBL Rome

Additional information

Abstract
Optimal performance, in which a task is completed quickly and accurately, is difficult to achieve and maintain.  Is this because the neural pathways underlying the performance need to be accurately tuned through plasticity, or is it because of variability in the state of the brain?  Here we present evidence that waking mice are constantly in a state of flux – ranging from a state of low arousal and inattentiveness, to high arousal and stress.  The optimal state for performance of sensory detection or discrimination tasks lies in the middle – optimally aroused, attentive, and appropriately activated, but to some degree relaxed.  Rapid variations in the waking state of the animal, which occur on time scales as short as 10s of milliseconds, involve an interaction of the thalamus and cerebral cortex, controlled by neurotransmitter pathways that remain to be clearly delineated  These rapid changes in state can account for a significant portion of on-going activity in the mammalian brain, and therefore need to be fully understood and accounted for.


11 June 2024, 11:00

Motors and MAPs in mitosis

11 June 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

Abstract Chromosome segregation is performed by the spindle a dynamic machine composed of microtubules motors and other associated proteins MAPs We currently know a lot about the protein components what constitute the spindle However evolution has tuned these components differently in different organisms I will present different strategies that yeast insect and human cells have evolved... Abstract Chromosome segregation is performed by the spindle, a dynamic machine composed of microtubules, motors, and other associated proteins (MAPs). We currently know a lot about the protein components what constitute the spindle. However, evolution has tuned these components differently in different organisms. I will present different strategies that yeast, insect, and human cells have evolved to assemble the spindle for chromosome segregation. Understanding these different modes of spindle assembly may help fight cancer.About the speaker[Biographical information about the speaker].Meet the speakerTo meet with the speaker informally after the talks,sign up here [add link]. We especially encourage predocs and postdocs to take advantage of this opportunity.Attachments[Link to a file (for example a pdf of the seminar’s programme) - the file can be uploaded on the intranet]Connection...

Speaker(s): Phong Tran , Curie Institute , France
Host: Gautam Dey

Place: IC Lecture Hall

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg

Additional information

Abstract
 

Chromosome segregation is performed by the spindle, a dynamic machine composed of microtubules, motors, and other associated proteins (MAPs). We currently know a lot about the protein components what constitute the spindle. However, evolution has tuned these components differently in different organisms. I will present different strategies that yeast, insect, and human cells have evolved to assemble the spindle for chromosome segregation. Understanding these different modes of spindle assembly may help fight cancer.

About the speaker
[Biographical information about the speaker].

Meet the speaker
To meet with the speaker informally after the talks,sign up here [add link]. We especially encourage predocs and postdocs to take advantage of this opportunity.

Attachments
[Link to a file (for example a pdf of the seminar’s programme) - the file can be uploaded on the intranet]

Connection details
Zoom*: [link] (Meeting ID: [XXXXXXXXX], Password: [XXXXXXX])

Please note that the talk will yes/not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


20 June 2024, 11:00

Expansion microscopy for structural cell biology: from centriole architecture to human diseases.

20 June 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Grenoble

AbstractThe centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division cellular signaling and cell motility This organelle of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins some of which have been associated with human diseases How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture... AbstractThe centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division, cellular signaling and cell motility. This organelle, of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins, some of which have been associated with human diseases. How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture and how associated mutations could be involved in pathologies is still poorly understood. In this seminar, I will present the latest work from my laboratory, which tackle these fundamental structural cell biology questions using cryo-tomography, cell biology and our newly developed ultrastructure expansion microscopy (U-ExM) method.About the speakerVirginie Hamel (previously Hachet) is an expert in Cell Biology and Biochemistry. She completed her PhD under the supervision of Iain Mattaj at EMBL...

Speaker(s): Virginie Hamel, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Host: Kristina Djinovic Carugo

Place: EMBL Grenoble Seminar Room

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Grenoble

Additional information

Abstract
The centriole is an evolutionary conserved organelle coordinating fundamental biological processes including cell division, cellular signaling and cell motility. This organelle, of 500 nm long and 250 nm in diameter is composed of about 200 different proteins, some of which have been associated with human diseases. How these proteins are organized at the level of the centriole architecture and how associated mutations could be involved in pathologies is still poorly understood. In this seminar, I will present the latest work from my laboratory, which tackle these fundamental structural cell biology questions using cryo-tomography, cell biology and our newly developed ultrastructure expansion microscopy (U-ExM) method.

About the speaker
Virginie Hamel (previously Hachet) is an expert in Cell Biology and Biochemistry. She completed her PhD under the supervision of Iain Mattaj at EMBL (Heidelberg, Germany, 2004) working on the role of importin alpha in nuclear envelope re-assembly in vitro using Xenopus laevis egg extracts. From 2005 to 2015, she worked as a post-doctoral fellow and then scientist collaborator in the laboratory of Prof. Gönczy at EPFL (Lausanne, Switzerland) where she first studied timing of mitotic entry in C. elegans embryos followed by dissecting the mechanisms of centriole assembly both in vitro and in vivo. Since 2015, she is co-heading the Centriole architecture lab with Prof Paul Guichard in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Department at the University of Geneva. Their lab focuses on deciphering the structural mechanisms governing centriole assembly combining the use of cell biology methods, in vitro reconstitution assays, cryo-microscopy/cryo-tomography and expansion microscopy.

Meet the speaker
To meet with the speaker informally after the talks, please contact administration@embl.fr. We especially encourage predocs and postdocs to take advantage of this opportunity.

Attachments
[Link to a file (for example a pdf of the seminar’s programme) - the file can be uploaded on the intranet]

Connection details
Zoom*: https://embl-org.zoom.us/j/95432724854?pwd=NnJvUWU5dzU0L1NheEM2SFlQM3FPQT09(Meeting ID: 954 3272 4854, Password: Passcode: 765338)

Please note that the talk will yes/not be recorded.
*For the FAQ section, as a zoom participant, please use either the chat function (the host will read out your question) or the “raise your hand” function and turn on your microphone.


27 June 2024, 14:30

tba

27 June 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Edwige Moyroud, Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Host: DB Unit

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


8 July 2024, 11:00

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8 July 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Yu-Chiun Wang, Riken Institute, Japan
Host: Juan Manuel Gomez Elliff

Place: Small Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


12 July 2024, 11:00

Using mouse and human stem cell models to identify neural circuit deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders

12 July 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Rome

About the speakerDr Singh is a Senior Scientist in the Donald K Johnson Eye Institute and Krembil Research Institute located with University Health Network UHN since 2020 He is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology LMP at the Faculty of Medicine University of Toronto Prior to this he was at McMaster... About the speakerDr. Singh is a Senior Scientist in the Donald K. Johnson Eye Institute and Krembil Research Institute, located with University Health Network (UHN) since 2020. He is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (LMP) at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Prior to this, he was at McMaster University from 2012-2020 where he was a Scientist and Neural Program Lead at the Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, The David Braley Chair in Stem Cell Research, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster University. His lab utilizes mouse and patient-derived neural 3D organoid/assembloid models, in combination with multi-omic approaches, to study neurodevelopmental and adult neurological and vision disorders. His program focuses on...

Speaker(s): Karun Singh, University of Toronto, Canada
Host: Hiroki Asari - EMBL Rome

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Rome

Additional information

About the speaker
Dr. Singh is a Senior Scientist in the Donald K. Johnson Eye Institute and Krembil Research Institute, located with University Health Network (UHN) since 2020. He is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (LMP) at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Prior to this, he was at McMaster University from 2012-2020 where he was a Scientist and Neural Program Lead at the Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, The David Braley Chair in Stem Cell Research, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster University. 

His lab utilizes mouse and patient-derived neural 3D organoid/assembloid models, in combination with multi-omic approaches, to study neurodevelopmental and adult neurological and vision disorders. His program focuses on studying genetic risk factors for neurological and vision disorders, and identifying molecular/cellular mechanisms of disease. The long-term goal is to utilize these platforms to study disease etiology, and develop regenerative medicine approaches such as genetic therapies. 


19 July 2024, 11:00

Science management and policy: roles influencing research culture

19 July 20242024Career EventEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Sean Sapcariu, Programme Manager and Research Culture Expert, Luxembourg National Research Fund, Luxembourg | Mathew Tata, Funding Policy and Governance Manager, Cancer Research UK (CRUK) | Victoria Yan, Open Science Research Information Specialist, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Host: EMBL Fellows' Career Service

Place: via Zoom VC

Career Event

EMBL Heidelberg


25 July 2024, 11:00

To be announced

25 July 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Grenoble

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Speaker(s): Manuela Hospenthal, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Host: Sagar Bhogaraju

Place: EMBL Grenoble Seminar Room

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Grenoble


25 July 2024, 14:30

tbc

25 July 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Brady Weissbourd, MIT, USA
Host: Levin Riedel

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


12 September 2024, 14:30

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12 September 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Nick Foulkes, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
Host: Jona Rada

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


1 October 2024, 14:00

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1 October 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg, Virtual

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Speaker(s): Lars Dietrich, Columbia University, USA
Host: Nassos Typas

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg, Virtual


17 October 2024, 14:30

tbc

17 October 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Hassan Salem, Max Planck Institute for Biology, Tübingen, Germany
Host: Mohannad Dardiry

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


8 November 2024, 10:00

To be announced

8 November 20242024EMBL Distinguished Visitor LectureEMBL Rome

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Speaker(s): Ana Pombo, Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin (MDC), Germany
Host: Mathieu Boulard

Place: Conf Room/Building 14

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture

EMBL Rome


14 November 2024, 11:00

To be announced

14 November 20242024EMBL - Sapienza LectureEMBL Rome

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Speaker(s): John Cryan, University College Cork, Ireland
Host: Cornelius Gross

Place: Sapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma

EMBL - Sapienza Lecture

EMBL Rome


28 November 2024, 14:30

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28 November 20242024External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Sylvie Retaux, Paris‑Saclay Institute of Neuroscience, France
Host: idoia quintana Urzainqui

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


16 January 2025, 14:30

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16 January 20252025External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Barbara Treutlein, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
Host: Hanh Vu

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


20 February 2025, 14:30

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20 February 20252025External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Allyson Sgro, Boston University College of Engineering, USA
Host: Jordi van Gestel

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg


15 May 2025, 14:30

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15 May 20252025External Faculty SpeakerEMBL Heidelberg

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Speaker(s): Michel Milinkovitch, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Host: Aissam Ikmi

Place: Large Operon

External Faculty Speaker

EMBL Heidelberg