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Rome

Tara stopover in Rome

EMBL and Tara: Rome

The next stop on Tara’s journey will be at the mouth of the Tiber

By Fabian Oswald

Events

From rodents to roadsters

Klaus Rajewsky recalls the pioneering spirit of EMBL Rome’s first years

By Josh Tapley

Alumni

PHOTO: Massimo Del Prete/EMBL

Buon compleanno! Celebrating 20 years of EMBL Rome

Friends old and new mark the occasion in style

By Cella Carr

Events

A model of CRISPR/Cas9

Wielding the genetic scissors

What CRISPR may bring for the future of biology, and how it is used at EMBL

By Fabian Oswald

Science

EIPOD4 logo banner showing the 4 available tracks, research, industrial, clinical and academic.

EIPOD4: 2019 applications are open

EIPOD4 will prepare researchers for the increasing interdisciplinarity of scientific career paths

By Josh Tapley

Lab Matters

Stock image of computer code. Coloured text on black screen.

Top tips for teaching yourself to code!

Overwhelmed as a biologist getting to grips with computer programming? EMBLers are here to help!

By Josh Tapley

Lab Matters

A smiling Santiago Rompani, new group leader at EMBL Rome, stands in front of a vine covered wall

Welcome: Santiago Rompani

New EMBL group leader explores what neurobiology can teach us about what it means to be human

By Josh Tapley

Science

EMBL's new Director General, Edith Heard.

Edith Heard starts as Director General of EMBL

On January 1 2019, Edith Heard takes up the position of EMBL’s Director General

By Emma Steer

Lab Matters

Mouse skin samples of the rare genetic skin disease amyloidosis, before light treatment (left) and after treatment (right). The arrows indicate aggregates of debris, which cause the skin to become rough and uncomfortable. Upon treatment these aggregates are reduced, allowing the skin to heal. IMAGES: Paul Heppenstall and Linda Nocchi / EMBL

Using light to stop itch

EMBL researchers have found a way to stop itch with light in mice

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Artist's representation of double helix next to black mouse.

Deleting genes to study how germ cells are born

How embryonic stem cells develop into the germ line

By Patrick Mueller

Science

EMBLetc.

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