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Origins Archives | EMBL

In this image of developing cells, fluorescent molecules reveal DNA (blue), part of the X chromosomes (red), and the Xist RNA (white). The green colour shows a region of the cells’ nuclei called the nuclear lamina. IMAGE: Mikael Attia and Edith Heard/Institut Curie

The scientific origins of Edith Heard

EMBL’s next Director General reflects on the questions that drive her research

By Guest author(s)

Science

Metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that sustain life. IMAGE: Fr. Kate Campbell

A serendipitous window into life’s beginnings

Markus Ralser, upcoming EMBO workshop speaker, on how metabolism brought chemistry to life

By Berta Carreño

Events

Origins at EMBL

Join us in our new editorial theme as we ask how everything began

By Guest author(s)

Science

Artists' impression of single cells

Insights into early cell life

New technique offers insight into early cell life

By Oana Stroe

Science

Meet some of the Humans of EMBL

Humans of EMBL: Past lives

Discover the past lives and journeys that brought people to EMBL

By Emma Steer

Lab Matters

Synchronised waves control embryonic patterning

Synchronised waves control embryonic patterning

EMBL scientists show that the rhythm between Wnt and Notch waves enables patterning in embryos.

By Iris Kruijen

Science

Retinoic acid signalling is crucial for the marine worm’s nervous system (green) to develop

Insights into the evolution of a signalling molecule

EMBL scientists discover how a molecule’s role changes from simple metabolite to instructive signal

By Emma Steer

Science

Artist's representation of double helix next to black mouse.

Study identifies new diabetes genes

Network of genes linked to development of diabetes

By Oana Stroe

Science

Charles Darwin portrait gravure - Darwin’s studies of orchids firmly established the idea that many types of flowers are pollinated by insects. PHOTO: iStock

On the orchids of Darwin

How Darwin’s work revealed the intimate relationship between orchids and insects

By Guest author(s)

Science

A section through an organoid stained for neurons in green, neural stem cells in red, and all cells in blue. IMAGE: IMBA/Madeline Lancaster

Using mini brains to understand big brains

What opportunities can organoids bring to further the understanding of the human brain?

By Berta Carreño

Events

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